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Ionascu Laboratory

Ionascu_Portrait
Dan Ionascu, PhD

Dr. Ionascu got his PhD in Physics at Northeastern University, Boston where he studied the structure and dynamics of biomolecules using a variety of ultrafast laser-based techniques such as vibrational coherence spectroscopy and broadband pump-probe kinetics that span the femtosecond to millisecond timescales. Much of his work involved heme containing proteins, which have roles in oxygen storage, electron transport, signaling and catalysis. He then pursued a postdoctoral research position at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School where he performed research in 4DCT, 4DPET/CT, IMRT techniques involving moving targets, marker-less lung tumor tracking, interplay effects and image-guided stereotactic body RT. After his postdoctoral work he was faculty in the Department of Radiation Oncology at William Beaumont Oakland University School of Medicine where he continued his research in tumor motion management but also in 4D-Ultrasound on-line tumor tracking, hyperthermia assisted radiotherapy, novel image processing approaches and advanced cone-beam CT imaging techniques.

Lamba_Portrait
Michael Lamba, PhD

Dr. Lamba received his PhD in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Cincinnati where, using a 3D superheated emulsion chamber sensitive to low LET radiation, he implemented fast high-resolution MR imaging techniques, automated hardware and control systems, and image processing software to perform dosimetry of brachytherapy sources. Subsequently he clinically implemented MR spectroscopy for brain and prostate at UC Medical Center and was involved with the dosimetric correlation of radiotherapy on the neurocognition of pediatric patients. With his interest in unique radiation dosimetry challenges, he has implemented and applied specialized techniques in radiotherapy. These include developing total skin radiotherapy in a confined treatment room; developing a custom-built radiosurgery delivery system for a linac; beta testing a 3D conformal radiotherapy planning system; implementing a beta IMRT system a linac with an add-on mlc; highly focal small animal irradiation; and the equipment specification, design, startup and subsequent operation of Precision Radiotherapy and the Cincinnati Children’s / UC Health Proton Therapy Center

Microscope

Our Laboratory is combining advances in radiation physics with recent developments and innovations in advanced, quantitative imaging technologies, radiobiology, biophysics and cell biology to investigate the effectiveness of radiation-drug interactions and facilitate true understanding of cell proliferation to develop adjuvant therapies. The Laboratory is part of the Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

We use an interferometric Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI) technique known as spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) to investigate thin, transparent samples such as cell cultures (image) or genetically manipulated bacterial colonies. SLIM is a noninvasive, label-free technique that makes quantitative, nanoscale, and 3D tomographic functional measurements on live specimens. Similarly, for strongly scattering tissues (organoids, embryos, tissues, and model multicellular organisms), we employ another interferometric QPI technique – gradient light interference microscopy (GLIM) – that extends label-free and quantitative 3D tomographic imaging to optically thick samples, with high resolution and excellent contrast. 

SLIM_Calc
SLIM_QPI

We use an interferometric Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI) technique known as spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) to investigate thin, transparent samples such as cell cultures (image) or genetically manipulated bacterial colonies. SLIM is a noninvasive, label-free technique that makes quantitative, nanoscale, and 3D tomographic functional measurements on live specimens. Similarly, for strongly scattering tissues (organoids, embryos, tissues, and model multicellular organisms), we employ another interferometric QPI technique – gradient light interference microscopy (GLIM) – that extends label-free and quantitative 3D tomographic imaging to optically thick samples, with high resolution and excellent contrast. 

SLIM+GFP
Mini_Xray

Reducing or eliminating the use of fluorescence markers typically used for imaging will drastically boost cell viability– unhindered by photobleaching and phototoxicity—and enable the use of radiation and quantitative phase imaging, simultaneously; allowing us to study and quantify radiation effects on cancer cells in real-time and label-free, from short to long time scales.

Contact Us

Dan Ionascu, PhD
Department of Radiation Oncology
The Barrett Cancer Center
234 Goodman Street, ML 0757
Cincinnati, OH 45267-0757

Office: 513-584-1450
Email: dan.ionascu@uc.edu

Michael Lamba, PhD
Department of Radiation Oncology
The Barrett Cancer Center
234 Goodman Street, ML 0757
Cincinnati, OH 45267-0757

Office: 513-584-1450
Email: lambama@ucmail.uc.edu