Today is Monday, Mar. 19, 2018

Department of

Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry & Microbiology

  • UC home for microbiology
  • Cutting edge research
  • First-rate biomedical training

Welcome to Molgen! 

Welcome to the Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology at the University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center. Please take a few moments to browse through the site and learn about our department, our research, and our graduate programs.

The department is part of the University of Cincinnati’s College of Medicine and currently comprises 17 primary faculty members and 24 affiliate faculty members with interests ranging from cardiovascular biology to microbiology/immunology and from cancer genetics to structural biology. In addition to our traditional Molecular Genetics Program we are now collaborating with the Division of Human Genetics at Cincinnati Children's Hospital to offer an exciting new Human Genetics Program. 

For more information about the University of Cincinnati and Graduate School in the Biomedical Sciences please view the following video.


If you are contemplating a biomedical research career in the academic, educational, federal or commercial worlds, choosing the proper graduate program for your training is one of the most important decisions you will make. Click here for more information regarding the admission process.

Not only are you selecting the location for the final stage in your formal education, you are also choosing a home for the next several years.

With the future of medicine and medical practice firmly rooted in recent advances in biochemical and genetic technologies, the graduate program in Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Microbiology at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine is ideally placed to provide you with the challenge, intellectual excitement and high-level training necessary to jump-start your career in molecular biology and medicine.

Upcoming Molgen Seminars

Tuesday, March 13, 12:00 PM in MSB 3351. Alvaro Puga, Ph.D. University of Cincinnati “Fetal Exposure to Environmental Stressors Disrupts Cardiac Embryogenesis and Promotes Abnormal Adult Heart Function"

Recent Molgen News

3/8/2018: Congrats to Molgen Graduate Student Hashim Aljohani for receiving a 2018-2019 Graduate School Excellence Award from the University of Cincinnati. Way to go Hashim!

2/2/2018: Congrats to Molgen Graduate Student Alex Yarawsky for receiving a 2018-2019 Dean's Fellowship from the University of Cincinnati. Way to go Alex!

1/22/2018: Molgen welcomes new faculty members, Dr. Agnes Luo and Dr. Katherine Vest. 

1/18/2018:  Thompson Lab publishes landmark paper illustrating how muscle growth is controlled. Please see the UC Health News article for more information

12/11/2017:  Dr. Anil Menon was a guest on ABC WCPO-TV Channel 9 with news anchor Tanya O'Rourke during her segment How accurate are in-home DNA tests like Ancestry, 23andMe?

12/8/2017: Congratulations to Drs. Mike Lieberman and Eric Gruenstein for receiving Optime Magistrum (Best Teacher) and Honorable Mention Awards for their efforts in teaching Medical Students. 

12/5/2017: Former Herr Lab PhD student Catie Shelton has accepted a position as at Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Northern Kentucky University. Congratulations Catie!!

10/25/2017: Former Deepe Lab PhD student Wendy Szymczak has been elected President of the New York City Chapter of the ASM. Congratulations Wendy!!

6/16/2017: Professor Ed Choi won the 2017 UC Golden Apple award for excellence in medical school teaching. The award is voted upon by the first year medical students. Way to go Ed!!

5/31/2017: Molgen Graduate Student Alex Yarawsky recently won a Travel Award from Beckman Coulter to present his research at the 2017 AUC Meeting in Glasgow, Scotland. Way to go Alex!!

5/18/2017: Former Miller Lab summer student featured in ASPET SURF 25th Anniversary Booklet.

5/5/2017: Congratulations to Dr. Lingrel who will receive the 2017 College of Medicine Research Service Award.

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UC Researchers Illustrate How Muscle Growth Inhibitor Is Activated

UC researchers have identified how the inactive or latent form of GDF8, asignaling protein also known as myostatin and responsible for limiting muscle,is activated. Read Story

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