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Medical Student Education

Second Year Curriculum

Brain, Mind and Behavior

Credit Hours: 14

Course #: 26950213



Course Directors:
Bruce Giffin, PhD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room G454B
Phone: 513-558-5617
Email: bruce.giffin@uc.edu

John Quinlan, MD
Office: Stetson Building Room 2332
Phone: 513-558-5443
Email: john.quinlan@uc.edu

The Brain, Mind, and Behavior course provides varied learning opportunities to assist the medical student in developing a strong structural, functional, and clinically oriented knowledge base in the neurosciences, and to develop an understanding of the pathologic characteristics, signs, symptoms, and treatment modalities for common neurologic and psychiatric disorders.

Overall course objectives:

  • Describe the molecular and cellular features of neurons and their supporting cells; discuss the responses of these cells to injury, including mechanisms for plastic changes and regeneration.
  • Outline the chemical, physical, and molecular properties of neurons related to impulse conduction and synaptic transmission, we well as the clinical manifestations of membrane potential and synaptic failure.
  • Discuss the biochemical, synaptic, pathway, and functional features of the major neurochemical systems and describe their role in the pathophysiology of various neurological and psychiatric disorders.
  • Diagram the major structures involved in the vascular, cerebrospinal fluid and blood-brain barrier systems; discuss their role in contributing to and responding to CNS pathology; describe their use in clinical diagnosis and treatment.
  • Know the major events in central and peripheral nervous system development as well as features and causes of some preventable CNS developmental disorders.
  • Describe the main neuroanatomic and functional features of the spinal cord and brainstem as well as their reflexes, blood supply, and common disorders.
  • Discuss the anatomy and function of individual cranial nerves and spinal nerves, their peripheral distributions, roles in reflex testing, and clinical signs of dysfunction.
  • Compare and contrast the anatomic and physiologic features of the general sensory systems with those of the special senses of vision, hearing, balance, smell and taste; describe clinical signs of sensory system lesions at different CNS levels; localize lesions involving these systems based on history and/or clinical signs and symptoms.
  • Diagram the anatomic and functional features of motor systems that control movements of the trunk, limbs, head, and eyeballs; describe the nature and time course of clinical deficits following different types of motor system insults; localize motor system pathology based on clinical signs and/or clinical images.
  • Describe selected pathologies of the eyeball and their treatment modalities.
  • Outline and diagram the neural pathways involved in visceral, endocrine, and behavior responses to external and internal change; compare neural, endocrine, and behavior changes associated with regional hypothalamic, pituitary, and autonomic nervous system dysfunction.
  • Describe the consciousness system and its role in attention, arousal, and sleep; describe the locations where lesions can affect the level of consciousness; discuss the physiologic basis and clinical importance of the EEG; describe the neurological examination for brain death.
  • Describe the neural mechanisms of sleep and how selected sleep disorders disrupt the sleep cycle.
  • Describe the symptoms of, and basic treatment strategies for disorders that alter consciousness (sleep disorders, coma, seizures) including the pharmacology of general anesthetics and sedate/hypnotic agents.
  • Describe the regional anatomical and functional features of the cerebral cortex (especially those associated with cognition, speech, learning and memory); understand the known molecular mechanisms behind learning, memory, and other forms of synaptic plasticity; understand clinical terms and clinical signs associated with regional cortical dysfunction.
  • Diagram neural systems involved in emotional feelings, emotional expression (behavior), and motivation;discuss the effects of stress and neurotransmitter imbalance on structural and functional features of the nervous system, particularly those involved with cognition and emotional behavior.
  • Explain the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional features of the stages of behavioral development from birth to late adulthood.
  • Apply problem-solving skills to acquired neuroscience knowledge in order to predict the location and probable pathophysiology of a patient described in a case study where pertinent findings from the history, clinical signs and symptoms, and possible lab tests and/or clinical images are provided.
  • Use information technology as a resource to access high-quality and current material related to a clinical problem or topic.
  • Describe the syndromes that comprise the major groups of psychiatric disorders (anxiety disorders, somatoform and dissociative disorders, personality disorders, eating disorders, impulse control disorders, selected child mental disorders) and the validating criteria for psychiatric diagnoses.
  • List the important features of a clinical assessment of behavior and be able to recognize symptoms of common psychiatric disorders.
  • Integrate neuropharmacology, neuroimaging, and neuropathology into their understanding of the biological bases of psychiatric disorders.
  • Describe the basic techniques and indications for the major types of psychotherapy.
  • Identify and understand the pathological features, neurological systems, and treatment for nervous system insults resulting from hypoxia, ischemia, and axonal transection.
  • Identify and understand the pathological features, neurological systems, and treatment for common neurodegenerative diseases, central inflammatory disease, tumors, and central and peripheral motor diseases.
  • Describe the pharmacology (drugs to treat Parkinson's disease, drugs to treat mania and depression, drugs to treat anxiety disorders, drugs to treat psychotic disorders) and efficacy of agents used in the treatment of nervous system disorders as well as possible adjunctive therapy and drug-drug interactions.
  • Describe the pharmacology and clinical application of drugs used in pediatric and adult sedation and pain-control as well as strategies for approaching chronic and cancer pain.
  • Define and discuss the neurobiology of drug dependence, addiction, tolerance, and withdrawal, and the pharmacology, clinical aspects and treatment of commonly abused substances (nicotine, alcohol, street drugs).
  • Solve case-based problems in which the scope of analysis illustrates and reinforces basic neuroscience principles, neuroanatomic relationships, principles of systems organization, and functional correlates.
  • Demonstrate skills in clinical thinking, which should include a knowledge of symptoms and signs of neurologic disorders, and the ability to know where and what the lesion is in the CNS when given clinical cases.
  • Complete the neuroimaging self-study component and be able to describe the basic techniques used for imaging the central nervous system and its vasculature and demonstrate skill in the analysis of neuroimages; analyze features of and identify structures and pathologies in different types of clinical images.
  • Describe the basic principles underlying some of the most frequently used diagnostic tests for neurological disorders.
  • Describe some of the gender-dependent features of the human that may contribute to gender-related differences in some central nervous system disorders.
  • Identify and describe the function of the major anatomical structures of the head and neck and make reasonable predictions of the clinical manifestation of injury or disease of these anatomic structures.
  • Recognize important clinical structures and landmarks of the head and neck on plain film, magnetic resonance, and computer tomographic images

 



Blood and Cardiovascular System

Credit Hours: 9

Course #: 26950226



Course Directors:
Donald Lowrie, PhD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room G454A
Phone: 513-558-5032
Email: dj.lowrie@uc.edu

Laura Wexler, MD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room 3363
Phone: 513-558-4721
Email: laura.wexler@uc.edu

This course will utilize an integrative approach to examine the structure and function of the blood and cardiovascular systems in health and disease. Specific disciplines covered will include anatomy, biochemistry, embryology, epidemiology, genetics, histology, immunology, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology and physiology. Study of disease states will include the interrelationships between the pathologic and physiologic responses of the blood, heart, and vasculature. Current treatment options including pharmacological and surgical approaches will be discussed with a focus toward learning the mechanistic modes of action. Clinical problem solving will be used as the bridge to integrate the basic and clinical information into a practical fund of knowledge that will serve as a solid foundation for life-long learning and delivering high quality patient.

Overall course objectives:

  • Describe the normal development, structure and function of each of these systems:
    • Blood
    • Cardiovascular
  • Describe how these organ systems jointly function to maintain a dynamic physiologic homeostasis.
  • Describe the basic science required to understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for common clinical disorders of the blood and cardiovascular systems.
  • Compare and contrast the pathogenesis of diseases that affects these organ systems, and discuss how pathologic changes in anatomy and physiology in one organ alters function in the other organ systems.
  • Formulate an initial differential diagnosis for common blood and cardiovascular diseases based upon routinely used diagnostic tests.
  • Describe standard therapeutic approaches to treat common diseases affecting each of these organ systems.
  • Explain the basic science underlying the therapeutic benefits and adverse side effects of pharmacologic agents.
  • Develop skills in independent learning that will enable application of basic and clinical sciences to clinical practice.

 


Renal and Pulmonary Systems

Credit Hours: 10

Course #: 26950227



Course Directors:
Donald Lowrie, PhD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room G454A
Phone: 513-558-5032
Email:dj.lowrie@uc.edu

Robert Luke, MD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room 6364
Phone: 513-558-0325
Email: robert.luke@uc.edu

This course will utilize an integrative approach to examine the structure and function of the renal and pulmonary systems in health and disease. Specific disciplines covered will include anatomy, biochemistry, embryology, epidemiology, genetics, histology, immunology, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology and physiology.

Study of disease states will include the interrelationships between the pathologic and physiologic responses of the kidneys, excretory structures and upper and lower respiratory structures. Current treatment options including pharmacological and surgical approaches will be discussed with a focus toward learning the mechanistic modes of action.

Clinical problem solving will be used as the bridge to integrate the basic and clinical information into a practical fund of knowledge that will serve as a solid foundation for life-long learning and delivering high-quality patient care.

Overall course objectives:

  • Describe the normal development, structure and function of each of these systems:
    • Renal
    • Pulmonary
  • Describe the basic science required to understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for common clinical disorders of the renal and pulmonary systems.
  • Compare and contrast the pathogenesis of diseases that affects these organ systems and discuss how pathologic changes in anatomy and physiology in one organ alters function in the other organ systems.
  • Formulate an initial differential diagnosis for common renal and pulmonary diseases based upon routinely used diagnostic tests.
  • Describe standard therapeutic approaches to treat common diseases affecting each of these organ systems.
  • Explain the basic science underlying the therapeutic benefits and adverse side effects of pharmacologic agents.
  • Develop skills in independent learning that will enable application of basic and clinical sciences to clinical practice.
  • Describe how these two systems control acid-base balance in health and disease.
  • Explain the general approach to diagnosis and causes, and specific treatments of, edema, shock and dyspnea.

 


Clinical Skills 201-202

Credit Hours: 4 Each

Course #: 26950218 & 26950219



Course Directors:
Michael Sostok, MD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room E350
Phone: 513-558-7728
Email: mike.sostok@uc.edu

Bruce Giffin, PhD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room G454B
Phone: 513-558-5617
Email:bruce.giffin@uc.edu

Clinical Skills 101-202 provides students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to manage a variety patients in the clinical setting. Through the use of simulation with standardized (simulated) patients (SP) and Standardized Patient Instructors (SPI), students work in teams to develop their data gathering, interpretation, clinical reasoning and communication skills. In addition students learn the importance of professionalism which is developed and evaluated throughout the course. Faculty provide guidance in the development of these skills throughout the course and provide context for students as they prepare for the M3/M4 clinical rotations.

Overall course objectives:

  • Gather a history and perform a physical exam (Note: CS 101 this will be the complete basic history and physical exam. CS 102-202 will focus on problem based history and physical exam integrated with the organ system block
  • Prioritize a differential diagnosis following a clinical encounter
  • Recommend/Interpret common diagnostic and screening test
  • Document a clinical encounter in a patient record
  • Form clinical questions and retrieve evidence to advance patient care
  • Recognize a patient requiring urgent or emergent care and initiate evaluation and management (CS 102-202)
  • Provide a patient centered case presentation to the clinical team (CS 201-202)
  • Work collaboratively with fellow students to provide safe and effective patient care (CS 102-202)
  • Understand and display professional behaviors expected of health care professionals

 


Interprofessional Experience (IPEx) 201

Credit Hours: 4

Course #: 26950222



Course Directors:
Tiffiny Diers, MD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room 6603
Phone: 513-558-7581
Email: tiffiny.diers@uc.edu

Course Coordinator:
Gina Burg
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room G453C
Phone: 513-558-8447
Email: gina.burg@uc.edu

Team-based health care is known to produce better patient outcomes and health professional satisfaction. To prepare you for your future role as physicians working collaboratively in teams with diverse health professionals, the Interprofessional Experiences courses, IPEX 101 in Spring of the M1 year and IPEX 201 in Fall of the M2 year, provide 1) shadowing opportunities with other health professionals in practice settings, 2) experiential learning with interprofessional students, 3) training in teamwork and 4) on-line coursework in patient safety. Through these activities, it is expected that you will progress in developing competencies needed for interprofessional collaborative practice.

Overall course objectives:

  • Values/Ethics for Interprofessional Practice: Work with individuals of other professions to maintain a climate of mutual respect and shared values
  • Roles/Responsibilities: Use the knowledge of one’s own role and those of other professions to appropriately assess and address the healthcare needs of the patients and populations served.
  • Interprofessional Communication: Communicate with patients, families, communities and other health professionals in a responsive and responsible manner that supports a team approach to the maintenance of health and the treatment of disease.
  • Teams and Teamwork: Apply relationship-building values and the principles of team dynamics to perform effectively in different team roles to plan and deliver patient/population-centered care that is safe, timely, efficient, effective and equitable.

 


Longitudinal Primary Care Clerkship 201 & 202

Credit Hours: 4 Each

Course #: 26950220 & 26950221



Course Director: 
Sarah Pickle, MD
Office: Medical Sciences Building
Email: sarah.pickle@uc.edu

Roohi Kharofa, MD
Office: Medical Sciences Building
Email: Roohi.Kharofa@cchmc.org

Course Coordinator:
Nancy Jamison
Office: Medical Sciences Building
Phone: 513-558-1435
Email: nancy.jamison@uc.edu

This three semester program sequence for first and second year medical students is designed to introduce every medical student to the fundamentals of doctoring, moving from learning the concepts to practicing the specific skills and capacities. The fundamentals of doctoring include ten steps used in every patient encounter and must be practiced in order to gain mastery as a physician (see figure above).

This introductory experience pairs each student with an individual community preceptor and his or her patients to first observe how the steps are performed in practice by the preceptor followed by the student getting to apply and practice the steps. Through the semesters you are learning the basic science foundations and learning clinical skills, you will gain comfort with doing the fundamentals through interacting with real patients.

The goal is to give you a solid foundation for the third year clinical rotations where the fundamentals are practiced and monitored every day. Your performance in third year, a very important criterion for future residency applications, begins with LPCC. If the steps are not competently performed in residency, the next stage in training, then a resident is likely to remediate. Finally, if the steps are not mastered in clinical practice, then poor patient outcomes will result. This is why they are called the fundamentals—they are the foundation for effective performance as a student doctor, a resident and a practicing physician.

Overall course objectives:

  • Apply the 10 fundamentals of doctoring proficiently (develop the necessary clinical skills for entry in third year of medical school)
  • Develop a mentor-mentee relationship with a community physician
  • Relate the basic sciences material to the care of the patient (real-world context for learning basic sciences)
  • Achieve a comfort level with interacting and communicating with patients
  • Summarize the principles of primary care and their value to a health system
  • Impact patient illness experiences in a positive way
  • Develop a foundation for a professional identity as a physician

 


Physician and Society 102

Credit Hours: 4

Course #: 26950216



Course Directors:
Lisa Kelly, MD
Office: Stetson
Phone: 513-558-5151
Email: lisa.kelly@uc.edu

Joe Kiesler, MD
Office: Medical Sciences Building
Phone: 513-558-2095
Email: joseph.kiesler@uc.edu

The Physician and Society Course provides an introduction to the medical profession and the healthcare system, exploring areas of medicine beyond basic science that directly influence patient care quality. Multiples tracks are woven throughout this four-year longitudinal curriculum including community and population health, business of medicine, and the emerging physician identity. Physician and Society, the third segment of this longitudinal curriculum is a continuation of each of these areas and sets the stage for the integration of Physician and Society with your other courses and your application of what your are learning with patients and the community.

Specifically, the Physician and Society curriculum is currently taught during the first two years of medical school and is included in the third year intercessions. Physician and Society 201 begins where 101 ended The course has periodic sessions during the morning Fundamentals / Organ system blocks, and is integrated into the weekly Learning Community Cases. Physician and Society 101, 201, and 202 all follow the same format for sessions during the 2nd Hour of Learning Community.

The topics taught in the Physician and Society focuses on three core domains related to being a physician – community and population health, the business of medicine and the emerging physician identity. All three of these areas are essential for the physician to master in our evolving healthcare environment. While the organ system blocks focus on providing medical science knowledge, physician and society teaches students how the social, behavioral, and improvement sciences as well as evidence based medicine and ethics relate to the patient, the field of medicine and the larger society. At the end of the four years, we want students to have created a solid foundation in developing their future identity as a physician – considering their roles with patients, the profession of medicine and the community.

The first year of the Physician and Society curriculum encompassed all three core domains, with an emphasis on the first area of community and population health. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement identifies “improving the health of populations” as one of the three arms of their Triple Aim for Healthcare Improvement. The future role of a physician of any specialty will require skills in population health management. As first year students, you and your LC team members learned about determinants of health though a partnership with a neighborhood social service agency. Through implementing the Community Health and Service-Learning Modules in the first year, you gained knowledge and skills related to team building, health disparities, community resources, survey methods, poster presentation, and patient education methods.

The second year of Physician and Society curriculum will also encompasses the three core domains, but has a stronger emphasis on the business of medicine and the emerging physician identity. Over the academic year, you will have increasing clinical experience through LPCC and extracurricular activities. As you prepare to enter the M3/M4 clinical years, we will ask that you integrate your clinical experiences into discussions in Physician and Society. Evidence based medicine and ethics also are woven throughout the first two years and assessed on an ongoing basis to keep the

Overall course objectives:

  • Demonstrate ethical practice and professional behavior in interactions with patients, research, colleagues and your community.
  • Develop an ability to work in teams with other clinicians and health care professionals.
  • Develop leadership strengths and opportunities as a physician.
  • Develop strategies to advocate for patients in order to improve patient and community health care outcomes.
  • Advocate to reduce health disparities and improve the healthcare system
  • Describe the organization and financing of the US healthcare system, and their effects on access, utilization and quality of care for individuals and populations
  • Explain the legal responsibilities of physicians towards the patient, community and profession.
  • Demonstrate qualities of empathy and respect for people who come from different cultures and socio-economic backgrounds.
  • Describe your role in addressing medical errors and preventing mistakes.
  • Analyze and address the determinants of health - the social, physical, environmental, political, behavioral, cultural and genetic factors – which influence the health of patients and communities
  • Apply evidence-based practice to clinical decision-making, public health interventions and patient education.
  • Demonstrate an ability to help patients and communities improve their health through education and eliciting behavior change
  • Demonstrate how you will assist patients and families with end-of-life issues.
  • Practice behaviors that promote self-care and work-life balance/wellness.
  • Practice self-reflection, peer review, and life-long learning to continuously refine and improve your role as a physician.
  • Develop your identity and role as a physician.

 


Physician and Society 202

Credit Hours: 4

Course #: 26950217



Course Directors:
Lisa Kelly, MD
Office: Stetson
Phone: 513-558-5151
Email: lisa.kelly@uc.edu

Joe Kiesler, MD
Office: Medical Sciences Building
Phone: 513-558-2095
Email: joseph.kiesler@uc.edu

The Physician and Society 202 course serves as a continuation and more in depth exploration of the main theme areas of the business and law of medicine, physician identity and professionalism, community and population health, ethics and the humanities. This segment of this longitudinal curriculum includes large group sessions that are integrated within the organ system “red blocks” and sessions within the learning communities.

Overall course objectives:

  • Demonstrate ethical and professional behavior in interactions with patients, colleagues and your community.
  • Develop an ability to work in teams with other clinicians and health care professionals.
  • Identify leadership traits and opportunities as a physician.
  • Identify strategies to advocate for patients and improve community health care outcomes.
  • Identify health care disparities and strategies to reduce them.
  • Explain the challenges of navigating the public and private healthcare system.
  • Identify and explain the medico-legal responsibilities of physicians towards the patient, community and profession.
  • Demonstrate qualities of empathy and respect for people who come from different cultures and socio-economic backgrounds.
  • Describe your role in addressing medical errors and preventing future mistakes.
  • Interpret and address the determinants of health - the social, physical, environmental, political, behavioral, cultural and genetic factors – which influence the health of patients and communities
  • Apply evidence-based practice to clinical decision-making and patient education.
  • Demonstrate an ability to help patients improve their health through changes in behavior and habits.
  • Describe how you will assist patients and families with end-of-life issues.
  • Practice behaviors that promote self-care and work-life balance/wellness.
  • Practice self-reflection, peer review, and life-long learning to continuously refine and improve your role as a physician.
  • Develop your identity as a physician.

 


Multi-Systems

Credit Hours: 4

Course #: 26950224



Course Directors:
George Deepe,
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room 6104
Phone: 513-558-4704
Email: george.deepe@uc.edu

Donald Lowrie, PhD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room G454A
Phone: 513-558-5032
Email: dj.lowrie@uc.edu

Overall course objectives:

  • Describe the normal function and interaction of organ systems in a healthy individual.
  • Describe the abnormal function of organ systems inflicted by diseases that affect multiple organ systems.
  • Describe the progress of chronic diseases throughout the life stages of the individual.
  • Describe the most common emergency conditions.
  • Describe the treatments for diseases that affect multiple organ systems, chronic diseases and emergency conditions.
  • Describe the most common general complaints that a physician will encounter and be able to develop a differential diagnosis for each of these complaints.
  • Be able to determine which tests to order for common clinical conditions and describe how the results of these tests can help focus an initial differential diagnosis.

 


Learning Community

Credit Hours: 7

Course #: 269501011



Course Directors:
Steve Baxter, MD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room 1654i
Phone: 513-558-8107
Email:stephen.baxter@uc.edu

Course Coordinator:
Gina Burg
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room G453C
Phone: 513-558-7546
Email: gina.burg@uc.edu

First, the overall goal of the Learning Communities is to provide clinical education that will help integrate all aspects of the curriculum over the first two years of medical school. The cornerstone of the Learning Community activities is case discussion. Each week students are given patient cases, which provide clinical background and relevance for the basic sciences they are learning in the Organ Blocks. These case discussions will occur in small groups that are facilitated by a practicing clinical faculty member. Students will develop clinical problem-solving and critical thinking skills from the beginning of medical school.

To prepare for these case discussions, students need to seek out information from a variety of resources in order to answer probe questions about the case, prior to meeting to discuss the case. Development of these self-directed learning skills is very important to one’s success as a physician, so we work to develop these skills early in the curriculum.

Another benefit of the Learning Communities is the opportunity to work in small groups. Relationship building and teamwork is an important part of being a successful health care professional. No one person has all the answers or the exact same set of skills as another student, so working together to solve problems or complete a task is an everyday occurrence in medicine (e.g. the use of consultants.)

In addition to clinical thinking skills, Learning Communities focuses on teaching the many aspects of the art of medicine that do not fall under a particular specialty or domain such as physiology or internal medicine. While much of this material is covered in Physician and Society, a small group format is the best way to address many of these topics and issues, which really boil down to how to effectively interact with patients and the health care system, and the potential hurdles one will face as a physician.

In summary, the Learning Community experience helps students develop the thought processes and behaviors needed to be successful as a physician. While there is much factual knowledge needed to be a successful physician (and much testing to assess whether one is able to assimilate this knowledge), Learning Communities provides the major forum for students in the first two years of the curriculum to work on these other skills, and to receive feedback on their progress in developing these skills. This experience provides for a smoother transition to the clinical rotations in the last two years of medical school.

Overall course objectives:

  • Demonstrate clinical problem-solving and critical thinking skills.
  • Recognize and understand the importance of clinical signs and symptoms.
  • Form a differential diagnosis.
  • Demonstrate the attitude, behavior and skills of a self-directed learner.
  • Apply scholarly literature to solve clinical problems.
  • Demonstrate the qualities of empathy and respect for people who come from different cultures and socio-economic backgrounds.
  • Demonstrate the ability to have a constructive interaction with others (including, but not limited to, patients and all health care professionals) when resolving a conflict of opinion.
  • Demonstrate the ability to appropriately consider ethical issues that arise in patient care.
  • Demonstrate the ability to be a reliable team member by being active in team projects and providing leadership when needed.
  • Demonstrate skills and strategies to teach your peers.
  • Identify what roles other health care professionals play in providing optimal patient care.
  • Deliver a well-organized patient presentation.

 

Health Care Emergency Management Part II: Mass Casualty Incidents (MCI) Triage and Natural Disasters

Credit Hours: 0

Course #: 26950228

Course Director:
Dustin Calhoun, MD
Phone: 513-558-5617
Email:dustin.calhoun@uc.edu

Course Coordinator:
Janet Rosing
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room G453D
Phone: 513-558-5580
Email: janet.rosing@uc.edu
2 hours of individual study prior to a 4 hour lecture/small group session.

Overall course objectives:

  • Provide a general overview and understanding of triage as it applies to situations of mass casualty incidents.
  • Understand and follow Simple Triage And Rapid Treatment (START). A method that provides rescuers with an easy, simple step-by-step approach to assessing and treating a large number of patients with varying degrees of injuries.
  • Provide an overview of the disaster operations, natural disasters, and explosive incidents.
  • Understand the available levels of disaster response from the individual, to the community, to national and international.