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Medical Student Education

First Year Curriculum

Healthcare Emergency Management: Physician 1st Responder

Credit Hours: 3

Course #: 26950124



Course Directors:
Kay Vonderschmidt, MPA, MS, NRP
Phone: 513-585-8949
Email: kay.vonderschmidt@uc.edu

Course Coordinator:
Janet Rosing
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room G453D
Phone: 513-558-5580
Email: janet.rosing@uc.edu

This course is the first of four healthcare emergency management courses and will complement the other three years of the healthcare emergency management curriculum. The course requires mandatory attendance for both lectures and small group skill sessions which will occur over your first two weeks of medical school. Additionally, there are reading assignments and the American Heart Association (AHA) online basic life support course that will need to be completed.

The course is designed to teach the novice medical school student how to detect the difference between the stable and unstable patient and provide basic emergency medical treatment. You will learn how to take vital signs, perform CPR, maintain an airway, bleeding control and patient assessments. This first course is designed as a basic course only and provides the student with the foundation for which all other medical school courses build upon.

Overall course objectives:

  • Apply the fundamental knowledge of anatomy and function of all human systems to the provision of basic emergency care.
  • Use foundational anatomical and medical terms in written and oral communication with colleagues and other health care providers.
  • Perform a simple medical and trauma assessment to identify and correct life threats.
  • Understand the guidelines on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiac care (ECC).

 



Learning Community

Credit Hours: 3

Course #: 269501011



Course Directors:
Steve Baxter, MD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room 1654i
Phone: 513-558-8107
Email: stephen.baxter@uc.edu

Course Coordinator:
Gina Burg
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room G453C
Phone: 513-558-7546
Email: gina.burg@uc.edu

First, the overall goal of the Learning Communities is to provide clinical education that will help integrate all aspects of the curriculum over the first two years of medical school. The cornerstone of the Learning Community activities is case discussion. Each week students are given patient cases, which provide clinical background and relevance for the basic sciences they are learning in the Organ Blocks. These case discussions will occur in small groups that are facilitated by a practicing clinical faculty member. Students will develop clinical problem-solving and critical thinking skills from the beginning of medical school.

To prepare for these case discussions, students need to seek out information from a variety of resources in order to answer probe questions about the case, prior to meeting to discuss the case. Development of these self-directed learning skills is very important to one’s success as a physician, so we work to develop these skills early in the curriculum.

Another benefit of the Learning Communities is the opportunity to work in small groups. Relationship building and teamwork is an important part of being a successful health care professional. No one person has all the answers or the exact same set of skills as another student, so working together to solve problems or complete a task is an everyday occurrence in medicine (e.g. the use of consultants.)

In addition to clinical thinking skills, Learning Communities focuses on teaching the many aspects of the art of medicine that do not fall under a particular specialty or domain such as physiology or internal medicine. While much of this material is covered in Physician and Society, a small group format is the best way to address many of these topics and issues, which really boil down to how to effectively interact with patients and the health care system, and the potential hurdles one will face as a physician.

In summary, the Learning Community experience helps students develop the thought processes and behaviors needed to be successful as a physician. While there is much factual knowledge needed to be a successful physician (and much testing to assess whether one is able to assimilate this knowledge), Learning Communities provides the major forum for students in the first two years of the curriculum to work on these other skills, and to receive feedback on their progress in developing these skills. This experience provides for a smoother transition to the clinical rotations in the last two years of medical school.

Overall course objectives:

  • Demonstrate clinical problem-solving and critical thinking skills.
  • Recognize and understand the importance of clinical signs and symptoms.
  • Form a differential diagnosis.
  • Demonstrate the attitude, behavior and skills of a self-directed learner.
  • Apply scholarly literature to solve clinical problems.
  • Demonstrate the qualities of empathy and respect for people who come from different cultures and socio-economic backgrounds.
  • Demonstrate the ability to have a constructive interaction with others (including, but not limited to, patients and all health care professionals) when resolving a conflict of opinion.
  • Demonstrate the ability to appropriately consider ethical issues that arise in patient care.
  • Demonstrate the ability to be a reliable team member by being active in team projects and providing leadership when needed.
  • Demonstrate skills and strategies to teach your peers.
  • Identify what roles other health care professionals play in providing optimal patient care.
  • Deliver a well-organized patient presentation.

 


Clinical Skills 101 & 102

Credit Hours: 4

Course #: 26950111 & 26950115



Course Directors:
Bruce Giffin, PhD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room G454B
Phone: 513-558-5617
Email:bruce.giffin@uc.edu

Michael Sostok, MD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room E350
Phone: 513-558-7728
Email:mike.sostok@uc.edu

Course Coordinator:
Vickie Symmes
Office: MSB E350
Phone: 513-558-7725
Email: vickie.symmes@uc.edu

Clinical Skills 101-202 provides students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to manage a variety patients in the clinical setting. Through the use of simulation with standardized (simulated) patients (SP) and Standardized Patient Instructors (SPI), students work in teams to develop their data gathering, interpretation, clinical reasoning and communication skills. In addition students learn the importance of professionalism which is developed and evaluated throughout the course. Faculty provide guidance in the development of these skills throughout the course and provide context for students as they prepare for the M3/M4 clinical rotations.

Overall course objectives:

  • Gather a history and perform a physical exam (Note: CS 101 this will be the complete basic history and physical exam. CS 102-202 will focus on problem based history and physical exam integrated with the organ system block
  • Prioritize a differential diagnosis following a clinical encounter
  • Recommend/Interpret common diagnostic and screening tests
  • Document a clinical encounter in a patient record (CS 101)
  • Form clinical questions and retrieve evidence to advance patient care
  • Recognize a patient requiring urgent or emergent care and initiate evaluation and management (CS 102-202)
  • Provide a patient centered case presentation to the clinical team (CS 201-202)
  • Work collaboratively with fellow students to provide safe and effective patient care (CS 102-202)
  • Understand and display professional behaviors expected of health care professionals

 


Physician and Society 101

Credit Hours: 6

Course #: 26950112



Course Directors:
Lisa Kelly, MD
Office: Stetson
Phone: 513-558-5151
Email: lisa.kelly@uc.edu

Joe Kiesler, MD
Office: Health Professions Building
Phone: 513-558-4021
Email: joseph.kiesler@uc.edu

Course Coordinator:
Gina Burg
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room G451
Phone: 513-558-7546
Email: gina.burg@uc.edu

The Physician and Society Course provides an introduction to the medical profession and the healthcare system, exploring areas of medicine beyond basic science that directly influence patient care quality. Multiples tracks are woven throughout this four-year longitudinal curriculum including community and population health, business of medicine, ethics, professionalism and the emerging physician identity. This first segment of this longitudinal curriculum includes a focused introduction to each of these areas, setting the stage for the integration of Physician and Society with your other courses and applying what your are learning with patients and the community.

The first segment of this longitudinal curriculum includes a focused three week introductory block. Afterwards, the course has integrated sessions during the morning Fundamentals / Organ system blocks, weekly Learning Community Cases, and 2nd Hour of Learning Community. Physician and Society 102, 201, and 202 all follow the same format of integration.

Overall course objectives:

  • Demonstrate ethical practice and professional behavior in interactions with patients, research, colleagues and your community.
  • Develop an ability to work in teams with other clinicians and health care professionals.
  • Develop strategies to advocate for patients in order to improve patient and community health care outcomes.
  • Advocate to reduce health disparities and improve the healthcare system.
  • Describe the organization and financing of the US healthcare system, and their effects on access, utilization and quality of care for individuals and populations.
  • Explain the legal responsibilities of physicians towards the patient, community and profession.
  • Demonstrate qualities of empathy and respect for people who come from different cultures and socio-economic backgrounds.
  • Describe your role in addressing medical errors and preventing mistakes.
  • Analyze and address the determinants of health - the social, physical, environmental, political, behavioral, cultural and genetic factors – which influence the health of patients and communities.
  • Apply evidence-based practice to clinical decision-making, public health interventions and patient education.
  • Demonstrate an ability to help patients and communities improve their health through education and eliciting behavior change.
  • Demonstrate how you will assist patients and families with end-of-life issues.
  • Practice behaviors that promote self-care and work-life balance/wellness.
  • Practice self-reflection, peer review, and life-long learning to continuously refine and improve your role as a physician.
  • Develop your identity and role as a physician.

 


Fundamentals of Molecular Medicine

Credit Hours: 6

Course #: 26950105



Course Directors:
John Monaco, PhD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room 3261
Phone: 513-558-5521
Email: john.monaco@uc.edu

Keith Stringer, PhD
Office: CCHMC Location B4.214
Phone: 513-636-9876
Email: keith.stringer@uc.edu

The Fundamentals of Molecular Medicine course prepares students for the organ blocks by presenting foundational concepts and principles in molecular and cellular medicine. This includes an analysis of cellular structures and organelles, protein structure and function, nucleic acid biochemistry, replication and repair of DNA, the processes of transcription and translation, regulation of gene expression, modern molecular techniques used for diagnosis and research, the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, purines and pyrimidines, and fatty acids, human genetics (Mendelian and mitochondrial inheritance patterns and probabilities, positional cloning, cytogenetics, imprinting, triplet repeat expansions, multifactorial diseases, tumor suppressors, and the relevance of the human genome project to medicine), signal transduction pathways, and elementary nutrition. Mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to their environment will be presented, along with elementary pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of pharmacologically active compounds. Students will be introduced to some of the basic concepts and principles of immunology and microbiology. The material learned in this course will form the background for all courses that follow, and will be expanded upon in the Fundamentals of Cellular Medicine course, and as organ-specific functions are discussed.

Overall course objectives:

  • Identify cellular structures at the light and electron microscopic levels, interpret these structures and organelles with respect to their function, and apply that knowledge to the molecular basis of disease.
  • Apply the basic principles of human genetics and molecular techniques to the diagnosis and treatment of disease.
  • Describe the basis for DNA, RNA, protein, and lipid synthesis and metabolism, and apply that knowledge to interpreting how alterations in these pathways can lead to disease states.
  • Integrate the various metabolic pathways and to apply that knowledge to the diagnosis and treatment of metabolic and nutritional diseases.
  • Apply the basic principles of pharmacology to the metabolism of drugs under in vivo conditions.
  • Summarize how a cell senses and adapts to its environment, and integrate that knowledge with biochemistry and histology.
  • Discuss how disease results from a failure of homeostasis within the body, which causes impaired function.
  • Describe in general terms biological agents that are the cause of infectious disease, as well as the body’s defense system, both humoral and cellular, and innate and adaptive.
  • Apply the knowledge of basic immunology and microbiology to an understanding of the rationale for appropriate therapy of immune-mediated and infectious diseases.

 


Fundamentals of Cellular Medicine

Credit Hours: 6

Course #: 26950107



Course Directors:
Edmund Choi, PhD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room 3005C
Phone: 513-558-0067
Email: edmund.choi@uc.edu

Keith Stringer, PhD
Office: CCHMC Location B4.214
Phone: 513-636-9876
Email: keith.stringer@uc.edu

The Fundamentals of Cellular Medicine course prepares students for the organ system courses by presenting foundational concepts and principles in primarily cellular medicine. This course will build upon the molecular concepts and processes introduced in the Foundations of Molecular Medicine to examine more complex systems that involves cell differentiation and specialization. This includes topics in early embryology, blood and lymphatics system, the cell-mediated immune system, epithelial and connective tissues, and the nervous system.

Classes of infectious microbes will be introduced along with a brief overview of their infectious process, interactions with the host immune system, and the laboratory diagnosis of the infectious agent. An overview of the immune system in hypersensitivities, autoimmune diseases, transplantation and the various classes of immunodeficiencies will be presented. Other topics include cellular adaptation and aging, tissue repair, neoplasia pathology and the anatomy and pharmacology of the autonomic nervous system. The material learned in the Fundamentals will form the background for all courses that follow, and will be expanded upon as organ specific functions are discussed. Specific details on individual microbes and the use of antibiotics will be covered in the subsequent organ-based courses.

Overall course objectives:

  • Describe the principles of Cell-Mediated Immunity and the various effector functions.
  • Summarize how innate immunity interacts and responds towards infectious agents.
  • Describe the anatomical organization of the immune system including the lymphatics and the structure and organization of the primary and secondary lymphoid organs.
  • Describe the cellular and genetic basis of early embryogenesis.
  • Describe the histology of the epithelial and connective tissues.
  • Discuss how disease results from a failure of homeostasis within the body, which causes impaired function.
  • Describe in general terms biological agents that are the cause of infectious disease, as well as the body’s defense system, both immune and cellular, and the failure of cells to control their
    growth.
  • Apply the knowledge of microbiology to an understanding of the rationale for appropriate therapy of infectious diseases.
  • Be familiar with diagnostic approaches to immune-mediated and infectious diseases.
  • Cite major classes of diseases that result from either an overreaction or deficiency in the immune system.
  • Summarize how a cell adapts to its environment, and to integrate that knowledge with biochemistry and histology in describing cellular aging, injury and tissue repair.
  • Integrate the anatomy, histology, pharmacology, and neurology concerning the autonomic nervous system, and to apply that integrated knowledge to diagnosis of diseases concerning the autonomic nervous system.

 


Physician and Society 102

Credit Hours: 4

Course #: 26950116



Course Directors:
Lisa Kelly, MD
Office: Stetson
Phone: 513-558-5151
Email: lisa.kelly@uc.edu

Joe Kiesler, MD
Office: Medical Sciences Building
Phone: 513-558-4021
Email: joseph.kiesler@uc.edu

The Physician and Society 102 course continues a more in depth exploration of the themes of we explored in the 101 course - community and population health, the business of medicine and developing your identity as a physician.

Key topic areas will include ethics, evidence based medicine, end of life care, health policy and business of medicine, professionalism, community health, medical humanities and physician identity.

This second semester of this longitudinal curriculum includes focused large group sessions, learning community case material / discussions and a service-learning module.

Overall course objectives:

  • Demonstrate ethical practice and professional behavior in interactions with patients, research, colleagues and your community.
  • Develop an ability to work in teams with other clinicians and health care professionals.
  • Develop leadership strengths and opportunities as a physician.
  • Develop strategies to advocate for patients in order to improve patient and community health care outcomes.
  • Advocate to reduce health disparities and improve the healthcare system.
  • Describe the organization and financing of the US healthcare system, and their effects on access, utilization and quality of care for individuals and populations.
  • Explain the legal responsibilities of physicians towards the patient, community and profession.
  • Demonstrate qualities of empathy and respect for people who come from different cultures and socio-economic backgrounds.
  • Describe your role in addressing medical errors and preventing mistakes.
  • Analyze and address the determinants of health - the social, physical, environmental, political, behavioral, cultural and genetic factors – which influence the health of patients and communities.
  • Apply evidence-based practice to clinical decision-making, public health interventions and patient education.
  • Demonstrate an ability to help patients and communities improve their health through education and eliciting behavior change.
  • Demonstrate how you will assist patients and families with end-of-life issues.
  • Practice behaviors that promote self-care and work-life balance/wellness.
  • Practice self-reflection, peer review, and life-long learning to continuously refine and improve your role as a physician.
  • Develop your identity and role as a physician.

 


Longitudinal Primary Care Clerkship 101

Credit Hours: 3

Course #: 26950117



Course Directors:
Sarah Pickle, MD
Office: Medical Sciences Building
Email: sarah.pickle@uc.edu

Roohi Kharofa, MD
Office: Medical Sciences Building
Email: Roohi.Kharofa@cchmc.org

Course Coordinator:
Nancy Jamison
Office: Medical Sciences Building 4304
Phone: 513-558-1435
Email: nancy.jamison@uc.edu

The Longitudinal Primary Care Clinical Experience is a three semester program sequence for first and second year medical students is designed to introduce every medical student to the fundamentals of doctoring, moving from learning the concepts to practicing the specific skills and capacities. The fundamentals of doctoring include ten steps used in every patient encounter and must be practiced in order to gain mastery as a physician.

This introductory experience pairs each student with an individual community preceptor and his or her patients to first observe how the steps are performed in practice by the preceptor followed by the student getting to apply and practice the steps. Through the semesters you are learning the basic science foundations and learning clinical skills, you will gain comfort with doing the fundamentals through interacting with real patients.

The goal is to give you a solid foundation for the third year clinical rotations where the fundamentals are practiced and monitored every day. Your performance in third year, a very important criterion for future residency applications, begins with LPCC. If the steps are not competently performed in residency, the next stage in training, then a resident is likely to remediate. Finally, if the steps are not mastered in clinical practice, then poor patient outcomes will result. This is why they are called the fundamentals—they are the foundation for effective performance as a student doctor, a resident and a practicing physician.

Overall course objectives:

  • Apply the 10 fundamentals of doctoring proficiently (develop the necessary clinical skills for
    entry in third year of medical school)
  • Develop a mentor-mentee relationship with a community physician
  • Relate the basic sciences material to the care of the patient (real-world context for learning
    basic sciences)
  • Achieve a comfort level with interacting and communicating with patients
  • Summarize the principles of primary care and their value to a health system
  • Impact patient illness experiences in a positive way
  • Explain the role of primary care physician in the health system
  • Develop a foundation for a professional identity as a physician

 


Interprofessional Experiences 101

Credit Hours: 2

Course #: 26950120



Course Directors:
Tiffiny Diers, MD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room 6603
Phone: 513-558-7581
Email: tiffiny.diers@uc.edu

Course Coordinator:
Gina Burg
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room G453C
Phone: 513-558-7546
Email: gina.burg@uc.edu

Team-based health care is known to produce better patient outcomes and health professional satisfaction. To prepare you for your future role as physicians working collaboratively in teams with diverse health professionals, the Interprofessional Experiences courses, IPEX 101 in Spring of the M1 year and IPEX 201 in Fall of the M2 year, provide 1) shadowing opportunities with other health professionals in practice settings, 2) experiential learning with interprofessional students, 3) training in teamwork and 4) on-line coursework in patient safety. Through these activities, it is expected that you will progress in developing competencies needed for interprofessional collaborative practice.

Overall course objectives:

  • Values/Ethics for Interprofessional Practice: Work with individuals of other professions to maintain a climate of mutual respect and shared values
  • Roles/Responsibilities: Use the knowledge of one’s own role and those of other professions to appropriately assess and address the healthcare needs of the patients and populations served.
  • Interprofessional Communication: Communicate with patients, families, communities and other health professionals in a responsive and responsible manner that supports a team approach to the maintenance of health and the treatment of disease.
  • Teams and Teamwork: Apply relationship-building values and the principles of team dynamics to perform effectively in different team roles to plan and deliver patient/population-centered care that is safe, timely, efficient, effective and equitable.

 


Musculoskeletal-Integumentary

Credit Hours: 7

Course #: 26950119



Course Directors:
Mark Goddard, MD
Office: Stetson Room 5200
Phone: 513-558-2919
Email:mark.goddard@uc.edu

Andrew Thompson, PhD
Office: Medical Sciences Building Room G454C
Phone: 513-558-7375
Email: andrew.thompson@uc.edu

The Musculoskeletal-Integumentary course provides a foundation in the normal structure and physiology of the integumentary and musculoskeletal systems, as well as an introduction to clinical conditions related to these systems. Specific topics include the development of these systems and an overview of common developmental abnormalities; recognition of the structural components of skin, cartilage and bones, skeletal muscles and tendons, and joints at multiple levels of organization ranging from cells and tissues to gross anatomical structures; the physiology and biomechanics of muscles, and their actions at joints. Related topics in dermatology, genetics, imaging, microbiology and infectious disease, neurology, nutrition, oncology, orthopedic surgery, pathology, pharmacology, rheumatology, and burns and wound healing will be discussed in the context of these foundational concepts.

Overall course objectives:

  • Understand and describe the development and mature structure of the musculoskeletal and integumentary systems at the histological and gross anatomical levels.
  • Understand and describe the function of the musculoskeletal system in terms of its physiology, biomechanics, and actions at joints.
  • Understand and describe the physiology of the integumentary system.
  • Recognize common clinical conditions relating to the integumentary and musculoskeletal systems, and understand and explain their pathogenesis.
  • Describe common tools used in the diagnosis of related clinical conditions and common treatment paradigms.