Today is Monday, May. 22, 2017

Medical Student Admissions

Frequently Asked Questions 


Admission Requirements

Is a baccalaureate degree required for admission to the UC College of Medicine?
A baccalaureate degree is preferred but not required.

Does the UC College of Medicine have specific course requirements for admission?

No; we do not require any specific coursework.

Can students apply if they are currently enrolled in a graduate or professional degree granting program?

Yes, students can apply while enrolled in graduate coursework or completing additional degrees. If currently enrolled in a professional school or a degree-granting graduate program, an applicant must complete all degree requirements and show documentation of graduation or completion of requirements prior to matriculation. Updates should be submitted to the Admissions Office regarding grades, enrollment changes, and degree completion.

Does the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine allow students to delay matriculation?

The College of Medicine allows a one (1) year deferral for students who wish to take a year off prior to matriculating into the college. The deferral process is considered a "restrictive" process (i.e., students may not apply to other institutions after being granted a deferral) and is not automatic. Students interested in delayed matriculation should contact the admissions office for an outline of the process and deadlines.

Do I have to apply to AMCAS before I apply to the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine?

Yes.

What is the web address for AMCAS?

The website for AMCAS can be found through the AAMC's website here.

Does the UC College of Medicine accept transfer students?

Yes, we accept transfer students into the third year of medical school. We do not accept transfer students at any other time in their training.  To transfer, students must have completed two successful years at a U.S. allopathic medical school (accredited by LCME) prior to matriculation. The UC College of Medicine does not accept transfer students from international/Caribbean medical schools. Additional details regarding transfer application are available each Spring on the Transfer Admissions page of our website.

 

Application Process

What should I do in order to be considered for admission to the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine?

In order to be considered for admission to the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, applicants must submit:

  • AMCAS application 
  • UC On-Line Secondary Application 
  • Letters of recommendation 
  • MCAT scores that are no more than two years old at the time of AMCAS application submission.
    • For example, if you are applying for the 2018 entering class, you must submit scores from a 2017, 2016, and/or 2015 administration. Scores older than this will not be accepted.
  • A legible copy of the front and back of your permanent residency card, if you are not a U.S. citizen. 
    • This permanent residency card must be valid through the conclusion of a student's medical education (i.e., a minimum of 4 years from the date of matriculation).


Can I add additional information to my file regarding research articles, updated grades, activities, shadowing experiences, honors and awards, etc.?

Yes, this information must be emailed as a .pdf file attachment to the Office of Admissions at MDAdmissions@uc.edu.  The email must include your name and AMCAS ID # in the subject line.

How can I send in my permanent residency card?

Copies of permanent residency cards (green cards) must be sent to the Admissions Office via email at MDAdmissions@uc.eduInclude your name and AMCAS ID# in the subject line of the email and .pdf copy of the front and back of your permanent residency card. Your residency card must be legible or it will not be accepted and your application will remain incomplete.

Can I start the secondary application and finish it at a later time?

Yes.

Why are you asking me about "moving violations" such as speeding tickets on the Secondary Application, and what if I have one?

The Admissions Committee wants to know about any incidents of reckless behavior. One speeding ticket typically does not draw the concern of the Committee, unless you were cited for excessive speed or were thought to be a danger to yourself or others.  A failure to be transparent about these incidents will draw the Committee's attention; this tends to occur when the two (2) required background checks are inconsistent with the UC Secondary Application. Student should be aware that this type of inconsistency is grounds for/may result in rescinding of a student's acceptance at the UC College of Medicine.

Once I have entered information on the primary (AMCAS) and secondary applications, can it be changed if I make a mistake?

No. Once your applications are submitted, you will not be able to modify their contents. However, through our MedOneStop portal, you will be permitted to update your contact information. 

Admissions-Related Questions and Log-in Help

Who can I contact for Admissions questions?

For questions regarding the process of applying to the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, please first review the FAQs regarding the application process (outlined above). If your question remains unanswered, you may contact the Office of Admissions at via email at MDAdmissions@uc.edu.

Who can I contact for Login help?

For questions regarding login issues, such as password problems, please contact the UCIT HelpDesk at 513-556-HELP (4357) or helpdesk@uc.eduUnfortunately, the Admissions Office does not have access to login data.

  • When you contact the UCIT HelpDesk, they will request certain information in order to verify your identity. You will be asked for your Campus ID (also known as your "M number").
    • If you need to find your Campus ID/M number, you may do so here.


What if I need to reset my password?

The UCIT HelpDesk (513-556-4357) can reset your password. The UC Office of Admissions cannot reset your password.

  • When you contact the UCIT HelpDesk to reset your password, they will request certain information in order to verify your identity. You will be asked for your Campus ID (also known as your "M number").
    • If you need to find your  Campus ID/M number, you may do so here.

Letters of Recommendation

Where should my letters of recommendation be sent?

aamc.org/students/amcas/faq/amcasletters.htm

Does the UC College of Medicine require two letters of recommendation from science faculty?
No. The REGULAR MD PROGRAM requires one of the following: 1) a packet form your pre-professional committee OR 2) three letters from individuals who can properly evaluate your strengths as an applicant and future clinician.  If you choose to submit three letters, we suggest that you request two letters from individuals who can evaluate your performance in science coursework.

The MD/PhD PROGRAM requires 3 letters from individuals who served in an instructional or advisory capacity. If you have additional questions about the MD/PhD Program, please visit their website or contact them by phone (513-558-2380). 

How can I determine if my letters of recommendation have been received by the Office of Admissions?

Go to your status page in our MedOneStop Portal

  • Log on to our MedOneStop Portal
  • Then under "View Application Status Page" click "Click Here." 
    • A message will indicate if the letters have been received by the Office of Admissions. 
    • If your letters have not been received within three weeks, contact the individuals who are writing on your behalf before contacting the UC Office of Admissions.


Can I submit more than three (3) letters of recommendation?

Yes, you may submit a maximum of five (5) letters of recommendation.

Application Status

How do I know if any decision has been made regarding my application?

You may check the status of your application by going to our MedOneStop PortalAfter logging on, click on "Click Here" under the heading "View Application Status Page."

How can I update my address and e-mail for my application?

You must update your contact information through both AMCAS and the MedOneStop Portal.

  • Once you've logged into the portal, click on "Update My Profile".

Application Updates

Does the UC College of Medicine accept updates to my application?

Yes. Updates in a .pdf format can be sent by email to MDAdmissions@uc.edu. Your email must include your name and AMCAS ID# in the subject line and the body of the email should request that the attached information be added to your application file.

What constitutes an acceptable update?

The UC College of Medicine would like to be notified regarding any significant updates to your application portfolio. These updates tend to include new grades, research article acceptance or presentation of scholarly works at professional conferences, new shadowing/service/work/extracurricular activities that enhance your application, and honors or awards.

Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) Process

What is the MMI?

The MMI is a series of approximately six to eight interview "stations" or encounters that last eight to 10 minutes and are centered on a scenario. Each station has its own interviewer (rater); consequently, each student is evaluated by approximately six to eight different individuals. The station scenarios do not test or assess scientific knowledge but instead focus on issues such as communication, ethics, critical thinking, teamwork and opinions on health care issues.

What other schools are using the MMI?

While the MMI was developed roughly 10 years ago and the popularity of the MMI has been growing internationally, to our knowledge, the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine is the first U.S. medical school to solely use the MMI for interviews in the selection of students into an MD program. There are several U.S. medical schools currently using the MMI in the BS/MD and MD selection process and other schools are considering implementing the process.

How should I prepare for the MMI?

You should read through the outline of the MMI and understand the basic structure of the time limit and number of stations. Reviewing or going through a list of "practice" questions is not applicable because the MMI does not use the same questions as a standard interview. Doing practice interviews can be helpful because it might identify nervous habits and also help you feel more comfortable and relaxed.

 

EXAMPLE SCENARIOS from the MMI1 

Example 1: Dr. Cheung recommends homeopathic medicines to his patients. There is no scientific evidence or widely accepted theory to suggest that homeopathic medicines work, and Dr. Cheung doesn’t believe in them. He recommends homeopathic medicines to people with mild and non-specific symptoms, such as fatigue, headaches and muscle aches, because he believes that it will do no harm but will give them reassurance.

Consider the ethical problems that Dr. Cheung's behavior might pose. Discuss these issues with the interviewer.

Example 2:  Universities are commonly faced with the complicated task of balancing the educational needs of their students and the cost required to provide learning resources to a large number of individuals. As a result of this tension, there has been much debate regarding the optimal size of classes. One side argues that smaller classes provide a more educationally effective setting for students, while others argue that it makes no difference, so larger classes should be used to minimize the number of instructors required.

Discuss these issues with the interviewer.

Example 3:  Due to the shortage of physicians in rural communities, such as Northern Ontario, it has been suggested that medical programs preferentially admit students who are willing to commit to a two- or three-year tenure in an under-serviced area upon graduation.

Consider the broad implications of this policy for health care costs. For example, do you think the approach will be effective? At what expense?  Discuss this issue with the interviewer.

1Eva, K.W., Rosenfed, J., Reiter, H.I., & Norman, G.R. (2004). An Admissions OSCE: the multiple mini-interview. Med Educ, 38(3), 314-326.

“UCCOM does a great job of integrating anatomy, physiology, and clinical skills in a manner such that all aspects of becoming a good doctor are actively developed from the beginning.

Matthew,
Medical Student, Second Year