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College Of Medicine

Olugbenga Olowokure, MD, gastrointestinal (GI) oncologist and Associate Professor of Medicine, is dedicated to advancing GI cancer research, specifically for pancreatic cancer. With pancreatic cancer cases on the rise, Olowokure's research has never been more relevant.

"The developments over the last three years in oncology have been exciting, with the revamp of immunotherapies for multiple malignancies, but we haven't gotten a very big win in pancreatic cancer on that front yet," said Olowokure. "For very many years, we've been unable to shift the envelope significantly. Pancreatic cancer remains the deadliest of all solid malignancies on a stage to stage basis."

Dr. Olowokure in suit standing in hallwayOlowokure knows that many of his patents don't have the best odds, but he never gives up no matter the patient's age or how far the disease has progressed. Instead, he tells his patients to put on their boxing gloves and come to fight. In the face of the deadliest solid malignancy cancer, this researcher turned boxing coach never loses his passion and enthusiasm to make a difference for his patients through his research and his work as a clinician.

Olowokure could not be more grateful for his decision to move to Cincinnati, both personally and professionally. The collaborative, multidisciplinary environment and university support within the UC Pancreatic Cancer Center has helped Olowokure make significant strides in his research to improve the survivability of pancreatic cancer patients. Olowokure is thankful for the expertise, dedication and positive attitudes of his peers in the effort to advance cancer care in Cincinnati.

"The opportunity to be in a building with both clinical oncologists as well as bench-to-bedside researchers together as one has fostered additional interactions leading to new investigative initiative projects," said Olowokure. "I think we're really poised to take the UC Cancer Center to the next level."

Olowokure's next project in the fight against pancreatic cancer is a phase one study specifically designed for patients newly diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Through the UC Pancreatic Cancer Center, which attracts patients from all over, Olowokure hopes his research can advance pancreatic cancer care for patients around the globe, not just those in Cincinnati.


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